Thursday, February 06, 2014

Ow.

I feel like I've been kicked in the floating ribs by a mule. More on the right side than the left. I was probably just mobile enough yesterday to prevent any stiffness from setting in, but I'm thinking this is my body's way of telling me that my shoveling technique could use some work.

I even had the "ergonomic" shovel for most of the effort, only using the straight-handled one to do some shoveling around the curb out front.

I'm going to take two aspirin and lie down for another hour because I can.
.

25 comments:

TBeck said...

The only truly ergonomic snow shovels are the ones that have an engine attached.

Anonymous said...

You're holding it wrong.

Paul said...

Amen that. The shovel has had centuries of refinement. Nothing beats a corn shovel for moving snow other that anything with a motor.

Work on your core and the problem will resolve itself.

Planks are the easiest method, BTW.

fast richard said...

Even a single stage electric snowblower is far better than a shovel. Shovels are good for steps and other hard to reach areas, but if you get more than an inch or two of snow, it's time to use something more than human muscle power.

Anonymous said...

Dr. Motrin is your friend.

You and roomie should split the cost of a snow blower, thus guaranteeing it will never snow again.

Gerry

Firehand said...

No matter how fit you are, you do something like that it uses muscles in a different way, which can lead to "Ow!"

Down here a snowblower would be like a generator: when you actually need it it'd be wonderful, but how often would you actually USE it?

JimB said...

Two words....SNOW BLOWER. It's way cheaper than a pulled back or a heart attack

JimB said...

Two words....SNOW BLOWER. It's way cheaper than a pulled back or a heart attack

JimB said...

Two words... SNOW BLOWER. Way cheaper than a pulled back or a heart attack.

Will Brown said...

Myoflex is your friend. Even helps with the pain from a lower back disc trying to go all 'splodey on me. Also, keeps you all tactical 'cause it doesn't smell or get your clothes all greasy on the insides.

Kristophr said...

-13F here this AM ... but that fat white rain did stop falling out of the sky yesterday.

I can continue to hide indoors.

Evict shower-cat and take a long hot bath.

Kristophr said...

JimB:

Buying one is a mid-July task.

You can buy a bullet proof Husqvarna two-stage unit in summer, for the price of a cheap-ass Chinese made single-stage at Wallmart in winter.

Kristophr said...

Paul:

A Mk.9 flamethrower is easier than planks.

Jim said...

Barring a snowblower, HIRE someone to do it for you. Less capital expense, and you'll only have to put Motrin in your wallet to ease it's pain.



Jim
Sunk New Dawn
Galveston, TX

Anonymous said...

I felt like I'd been beaten up after using an ergonomic shovel. The regular shovel I modified with a 5' (6' overall after installed)handle makes it possible to shovel snow without being disabled afterwards.

Jon said...

For light snowfalls that I catch before they get tracked and smashed down, my leafblower works pretty well to clear driveways and walkways. My cousin posted a picture of her snow shovel that has a big wheel on it that looked pretty slick, too.

Knucklehead said...

Anonymous is lying. Buying a snowblower does not guarantee it will never snow again. It just guarantees it will not snow again until your shiny snowblower has sat unused long enough to refuse to start.

Anonymous said...

Knucklehead

I stand corrected. That is true.

Gerry

tailwind said...

The sole reason a shovel is marketed as "ergonomic" is so the mfg can charge more for it.

If you have to shovel, switching from right to left occasionally will lessen the strain.

If you overdo it you'll still be sore, but at least it will be evenly distributed.

rickn8or said...

"I'm going to take two aspirin and lie down for another hour because I can."

Ah, you people of the Leisure Class!

Mike_C said...

I'm with Paul on this one. I use what is essentially a corn shovel, albeit one made for snow and sporting a spiffy blue plastic blade. Never cottoned to those goofy looking "ergonomic" shovels. Supposedly they let you lift without bending your back (?), but seeing as my driveway is cut into a shallow hill, at the end of the driveway I have to lift/toss the snow 3-4 feet straight up just to clear the sidewalls. Maybe I need remedial physics, but I just can't figure out how a crooked-shafted shovel could possibly help with that. Lift a little less per toss, but save the back is my theory.

Hope you are feeling better. Ibuprofen and heat may or may not make things better, but they generally make me feel better.

Robert Fowler said...

I need a new snow blower. But for now, our 20 year old grandson that is living with us does a pretty good job. I explained to him that since he pays no rent, shoveling is the least he can do.

When the seasons change, he's going to learn the art of the lawn mower.

Anonymous said...

I feel for you Tam. I have felt like you in the past. That's why I now have a Kubota F2000 front mount tractor with a 48" two-stage blower. Ten minutes and I'm done blowing 200ft of driveway, then I go to the neighbours.

Shop Kijiiji and craigslist next fall and get a good used walk-behind with an electric start. Clean the carburetor and be sure to drain the carb and tank every spring and it will last a lifetime. In the long run it will save you money on chiropractors and physiotherapists.

Al_in_Ottawa

oldguy52 said...

Trouble with those ergonomic shovels is, what you gain in lack of bending you lose in leverage because the handle is so long and you are so far from the load. #14 grain scoop, best snow shovel there is.

The first law of snow blowing: No matter which way you face the blower it will be into the wind.

oldguy52

farmist said...

I've used a grain scoop to move snow for years. During late summer I put multiple coats of silicone on the blade. Keep the edge filed straight and somewhat sharp, it works well for anything airy enough to be called snow.